Ramona Sakiestewa

Areas of Expertise:

 

Arts – The value of artmaking.

 

Cultural Preservation – As it relates to museums, cultural centers, cultural groups.

 

Other – Design in artchitecture, site design.

 

Ramona Sakiestewa grew up in the American Southwest, and lives and works in Santa Fe. For more than 30 years she has written and lectured about Native American weaving and contemporary art including a USIA lecture tour of Japan.

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Good writers read a lot. It is simple. You need to have a good vocabulary to be a good writer. And reading gives you this valuable input. So the more you read the more your build your vocabulary and you get better at writing.

Good writers also need good editors. Even if you think that you are the best writer you need help. You need someone who criticises your writing and the editor should be someone whom you can trust. A peer editor can be the best if you are a starter.

A good writer has to constantly capture new ideas. He should keep getting creative input. The artist or the writer can better only with creative ideas. You need to know how to collect these ideas.

A good writer writes every day. This is essential and should not be overlooked. You cannot get good at writing if you do not practice. Even if it is just for a few minutes, you should take out time to write daily if you want to be effective at writing. In addition to her own tapestry work, her studio has woven the works of other contemporary artists including Paul Brach, Frank Lloyd Wright, and Kenneth Noland. Her own weavings reside in numerous public, private, and corporate collections. She recently changed media, exploring constructed works-on-paper, print work, and painting, and has shown in numerous group and solo exhibitions across the continent. For the past twenty years, Ms. Sakiestewa has worked with a series of nationally known architects designing elements for buildings and theming interiors. She has worked in a variety of media including stone, metal, carpet, and glass. Some of her work can be seen at the National Museum of the American Indian, Washington, DC. Ms. Sakiestewa was a participating artist in the Friends of Art and Preservation in Embassies in 2001. Her honors include the New Mexico Governor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts, induction into the New Mexico Women’s Hall of Fame, and recognition by the New Mexico Committee of the National Museum of Women in the Arts.